December 2018 Newsletter

Newsletter from Dermatology Specialists of Charlotte:  December 2018 SKIN CARE NEWS What bothers you most about your skin? Tell us your skin concerns It’s National Healthy Skin Month. This year, we want to hear from you, so we invite you to: Ask a board-certified dermatologist your burning question. It’s free. If your question is selected, you’ll find a video of a board-certified dermatologist answering your question on the AAD website. You don’t even have to give us your name. To ask your question, go to: Ask a dermatologist Join us on Facebook @AADskin and tell us your biggest skin concerns during #NationalHealthySkinMonth. We’ll respond by directing you to dermatologists’ tips and other resources that can help.   PATIENT EDUCATION During a vampire facial, also called platelet-rich plasma, small amounts of your own blood are injected into your face. People hope it will erase years from their face, but is this just wishful thinking? Here’s what the science shows. Is platelet-rich plasma the secret to younger-looking skin? Find our more by clicking here.       How to apply topical acne medication: Dermatologists’ tips for using acne creams To get the greatest benefit from acne treatments that you apply to your skin,…

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Problems with my skin: persistent itching

What causes itching? Problems with my skin seems to always involve itching. If itchy skin is an issue for you, you are not alone. Millions of American complain about itching skin. It sounds like a mild problem, but if it is constant, it can be tremendously distracting and frustrating. The itching skin conditions that come immediately to mind are hives, eczema, or a disease such as chicken pox. Some people experience itching all over their body, accompanied by cracking skin. For others, itching is in very specific parts of the body, as is the case with contact dermatitis, scabies, or head lice. If you have a mole that has started itching, you should have it immediately examined by your Charlotte dermatologist. Noticeable changes in moles are always a red flag, in which we want to rule out the possibility of a malignant change in the mole. Common hives Urticaria is the scientific name for what we commonly call hives. These are the resultant welts that occur when your immune system overreacts to the contact or ingestion of a product, and your body then releases histamine into the skin. Hives vary in size. They can appear as small as a pin…

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October 2018 Newsletter

Newsletter from Dermatology Specialists of Charlotte:  October 2018 SKIN CARE NEWS Melanomas in your ears About 7 percent of head and neck melanomas are found on the ears. Don’t forget to put sunscreen on your ears too. Read more here: bit.ly/2NnBVAy         PATIENT EDUCATION October is Eczema Awareness Month Globally, 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults have eczema. Though often times it does not have a clear cause, most eczema will improve with good skin care. Learn more about its symptoms and treatment here: bit.ly/2QMPewD       Use a Board Certified Dermatologist- like Dr. Deborah Nixon Board certified dermatologist have the training and expertise to provide the best possible skin, hair and nail outcomes for patients. Learn more about what it takes to become a board certified dermatologist here: bit.ly/2EDO0AL       What causes hair loss? Test your knowledge and learn the difference between temporary hair loss and a condition that needs treatment. Learn what causes hair loss here: www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/hair-care/what-causes-hair-loss-in-women   Keep protecting your skin! Protecting your skin doesn’t end with summer Use these tips to keep your skin protected from damaging UV rays all year round. Learn more here: bit.ly/1o03Cmo   Take the…

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August 2018 Newsletter

Newsletter from Dermatology Specialists of Charlotte:  September 2018 SKIN CARE NEWS Why women have hair loss Is your hair loss temporary, or do you need to treat it? When it comes to hair loss, you’ll find a lot of misinformation. Some of it can worsen hair loss. That’s why the AAD designates August as Hair Loss Awareness Month®. This year, we’re detangling myths about hair loss in women. Do you know the signs of hair loss in women? Can you tell the difference between hair loss that’s temporary and hair loss that needs treatment? You will after taking this short quiz. Quiz: What causes hair loss in women? Take the quiz here. PATIENT EDUCATION   Is your hairstyle causing your hair loss? If you often wear your hair tightly pulled back, it may be time to let your hair down. Find out what dermatologists recommend to help you keep your sense of style without risking hair loss. Hairstyles that pull can lead to hair loss. Learn more here.         5 simple steps for applying scalp medication If you find it tricky to apply scalp medication, these tips from dermatologists can help. How to apply scalp medications here.     …

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July 2018 Newsletter

Newsletter from Dermatology Specialists of Charlotte:  July 2018 SKIN CARE NEWS Signs of Heart Disease on your skin Signs of heart disease can appear on your skin — sometimes before you have symptoms, such as chest pain or shortness of breath. These pictures show you what to look for in the 12 warning signs below. Heart disease: Here are 12 warning signs that appear on your skin   PATIENT EDUCATION   Stick and spray sunscreens: Tips for using Learn the best uses for these sunscreens, how to apply them, and what precautions to take. Since no sunscreen blocks 100 percent of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays, it’s also important to seek shade and wear protective clothing whenever possible, including a lightweight, long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection. No matter what type of sunscreen you use, make sure you re-apply it every two hours when outdoors or immediately after swimming or sweating. If you have questions about which type of sunscreen to use for you and your family, ask a board-certified dermatologist for help.   How to use stick and spray sunscreens here.      Lyme disease cases to rise, CDC predicts When found early, Lyme…

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