February 2015 Newsletter for Dermatology Specialists of Charlotte

Frostbite: Prevention and Treatment

Frostbite can happen to anyone who spends time outdoors in frigid temperatures. The good news is that you can prevent frostbite.

You’ll find out what you can do to prevent it in this month’s video. Chock-full of tips, this video also tells you what increases your risk of getting frostbite and reveals how to reduce these risks. You’ll even get tips to prevent permanent damage if you develop early symptoms of frostbite.

Frostbite: Prevention and treatment (3:21)

What Dermatologists Tell their Patients

Winter winds and cold weather are common rosacea triggers.

If winter triggers your rosacea, be sure to cover your face with a soft-feeling scarf or ski mask before you head outdoors. Wearing a soft-feeling fabric is essential. Wool and rough-feeling fabrics can irritate your skin, causing the rosacea to flare.

Related Academy resources:

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Office News

Our New Physician Assistant

Lauren received her Bachelor of Science degree from North Carolina State University. She completed her Physician Assistant studies at Anne Arundel Community College and her Master of Medical Science at Saint Francis University. She completed her clinical and surgical dermatology clerkship in Annapolis, MD.
Lauren specializes in child and adolescent skin needs.  She will focus on acne, warts, eczema, rashes and other pediatric skin disorders.  She is also available for same day acute work in appointments.

Dermatology in the News

Indoor-tanning session sends some to ER
Most people know the long-term risks of indoor tanning, which include a much higher risk of getting skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Indoor tanning also has some immediate health risks. The most common immediate risk is getting a burn on your skin or eyes while in a tanning bed. These burns and other injuries can be serious enough to require treatment in the emergency room (ER).
You can learn more about the burns and other immediate health risks at:


Tanning-bed use common amongst college students
Students at many top U.S. universities and colleges can easily maintain a killer tan. According to a recent study, indoor tanning is readily available on many campuses or nearby at off-campus housing. In some cases, students can use their college cash cards to pay for indoor tanning.
This study’s researchers concluded that it is important to reduce students’ access to indoor tanning. We know that indoor tanning increases the risk of developing skin cancer, including the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma. Among people aged 25 to 29 year olds, melanoma is the most common form of cancer. To learn more about tanning beds on and around college campuses, read:

Academy resource:


Kid friendly information helps kids care for their skin, hair, and nails
Teaching kids about their skin, hair, and nails is important. Developing healthy habits at a young age can help prevent skin cancer later in life and keep a child’s skin, hair, and nails looking their best. If a child has a skin condition, learning about the condition can help a child cope.
For these reasons, the Academy’s website includes a special section for children. Written just for kids, this content covers everything from washing your skin to relieving itchy eczema. You’ll even find answers to questions that kids tend to ask, such as “What really happens to your nails if you bite and swallow them?”
A panel of dermatologists carefully reviewed the information, so you know your child will get trustworthy expert advice.
You’ll find this section of the Academy’s website at For kids.


Your child’s eczema story could help other children
To help parents care for a child who has eczema; the Academy will publish a multimedia guide. We’re looking for inspiring tips from parents. Have you found a certain treatment that works for your child? Do you have a creative way to overcome an eczema trigger? Has teaming up with a dermatologist helped your child?
Your insight could mean relief for many children living with eczema.
Please take a few minutes to share your child’s eczema story.


Dermatologist Discusses Effects Of Showers On Skin Dryness
The Today Show Online (1/14, Alexander) reports that while a Discovery News story suggests that people “stop showering so much” to avoid drying out skin, dermatologists say the issue has more to do with the drying effects of soap than bathing frequency, as soap “is designed to remove oils from the skin.” Casey Carlos, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the division of dermatology at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, “suggests using it in armpits, the groin area, feet — the potentially smelly places —and skipping chest, back, legs, arms.” Carlos further suggests taking shorter showers using lukewarm water and moisturizing afterward.


Preservative Used In Personal Care Products Linked To Allergic Reactions
The New York Times (1/23, Abrams, Subscription Publication) reports on allergic reactions that may be caused by a commonly used preservative called methylisothiazolinone, or MI, added to products “to deter the growth of bacteria.” American Contact Dermatitis Society’s president-elect Dr. Bruce A. Brod said that people’s sensitization rates are likely to go up if exposed to MI on a daily basis, while a lack of awareness among both patients and doctors compounds the problem.

Half Of US Prescriptions For Antibiotics Unnecessary
The Washington Post (1/29, Paquette) “Wonkblog” reports that according to the CDC, 80% of American are issued prescription antibiotics every year, and “up to half of the estimated 258 million prescriptions are unnecessary.” Jesse Goodman, director of Georgetown University’s Center on Medical Product Access, Safety and Stewardship and a former FDA chief scientist, says this is a “culture” problem and advises that “patient and doctor must understand these drugs are precious resources. The more we use them, and the more unwisely, the more resistance” will be built up against them.


Severe Cases Of Psoriasis May Indicate Dangerous Systemic Inflammation
The Dermatology Times (1/28, Dotinga) reports that at this week’s Maui Derm 2015 conference, attendees discussed the increasing awareness that “severe cases of psoriasis are indications of dangerous systemic inflammation.” For example, in an interview, Bruce Strober, MD, PhD, vice chair, associate professor and director of Clinical Trials Unit at the University of Connecticut, said, “Psoriasis patients are at greater risk of diseases of inflammation, such as hypertension, psoriatic arthritis, and obesity.” Dr. Strober added, “Patients with psoriasis may have vascular dysfunction, manifested by atherosclerotic heart disease and stroke. Also, fatty liver disease may be intrinsic to psoriatic disease.”


Adults With Eczema May Have An Increased Risk Of Heart Disease, Stroke
HealthDay (1/24, Reinberg) reported that research published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology suggests that “adults with eczema…may also have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.” Investigators “found that people with eczema smoke and drink more, are more likely to be obese and are less likely to exercise than adults who don’t have the disease.” Additionally, the research suggests “that eczema itself may increase the risk for heart disease and stroke, possibly from the effects of chronic inflammation…said” lead researcher Dr. Jonathan Silverberg.


Indoor-tanning session sends some to ER
Most people know the long-term risks of indoor tanning, which include a much higher risk of getting skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Indoor tanning also has some immediate health risks. The most common immediate risk is getting a burn on your skin or eyes while in a tanning bed. These burns and other injuries can be serious enough to require treatment in the emergency room (ER).


Tanning-bed use common amongst college students
Students at many top U.S. universities and colleges can easily maintain a killer tan. According to a recent study, indoor tanning is readily available on many campuses or nearby at off-campus housing. In some cases, students can use their college cash cards to pay for indoor tanning.

This study’s researchers concluded that it is important to reduce students’ access to indoor tanning. We know that indoor tanning increases the risk of developing skin cancer, including the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma. Among people aged 25 to 29 year olds, melanoma is the most common form of cancer.


Tanning Salons Now Banned In Most Of Australia
Medscape (1/21, Mulcahy) reports, “Tanning salons are now banned in most of Australia, a country with the highest incidence of melanoma in the world.” According to Medscape, “The ban on ‘commercial solariums’ took effect on January 1 in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, and Victoria, according to news reports.

 

 

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